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dc.contributor.authorLópez Steinmetz, Lorena Cecilia
dc.contributor.authorHerrera, Carla Romina
dc.contributor.authorFong, Shao Bing
dc.contributor.authorGodoy, Juan Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-03T03:10:22Z
dc.date.available2021-09-03T03:10:22Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-30
dc.identifier.issn1943-281X
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1080/00332747.2021.1940469
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11086/20083
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00332747.2021.1940469
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study examines Argentinean health care workers in order to 1) test self-perceived job performance levels and the presence of psychological symptoms compatible with common mental disorders, and 2) examine within-person changes in general discomfort and psychological distress, adjusting for demographic factors, region, and health-related factors during two time points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: This longitudinal study comprised 305 healthcare workers who completed a survey at two time points approximately 4 months apart. We used the General Health Questionnaire and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale to measure mental health outcomes. To address the first aim we calculated differences (Student’s t test for paired samples) and correlations (Pearson’s r coefficient). To address the second aim we used fixed effects model by means of a multilevel approach, a linear model that considers dependency in the data. Results: Self-perceived job performance deteriorated across time. From the first measurement to the four-month follow-up, more health care workers presented common mental disorders (40% vs 45.57%), depression, and/or anxiety (52.46% vs 62.62%). A meaningful worsening of mental health was observed in healthcare workers who expressed concern about being infected with COVID-19, whether asymptomatic (greater general discomfort and psychological distress) or symptomatic (greater general discomfort). Likewise, there were significant interactions between a history of mental disorder and concern about COVID-19 infection. Conclusions: Among healthcare workers, the uncertainty about the COVID-19 infection may have larger negative mental health impacts than actually being infected.es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectCovid 19es
dc.subjectHealth carees
dc.subjectWorkerses
dc.subjectPsychological symptomses
dc.subjectMental disorderses
dc.subjectPsychological distresses
dc.subjectPandemices
dc.titleA Longitudinal Study on the Changes in Mental Health of Healthcare Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemices
dc.typearticlees
dc.description.versionpublishedVersiones
dc.description.filFil: López Steinmetz, Lorena Cecilia. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Psicología; Argentina.es
dc.description.filFil: López Steinmetz, Lorena Cecilia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas; Argentina.es
dc.description.filFil: Herrera, Carla Romina. Hospital Wenceslao Gallardo, Jujuy; Argentina.es
dc.description.filFil: Fong, Shao Bing. University of Melbourne; Australia.es
dc.description.filFil: Godoy, Juan Carlos. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Psicología; Argentina.es
dc.description.filFil: Godoy, Juan Carlos. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas; Argentina.es
dc.journal.cityWashingtones
dc.journal.countryEstados Unidoses
dc.journal.editorialTaylor & Francis Groupes
dc.journal.pagination1–16es
dc.journal.titlePsychiatryes


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